KNITTED SCULPTURES 2002-2005
Exhibited at various locations including Penthouse and Pavement, Bus, Caroline Springs, West Space, Lake Macquarie Gallery, Conical, Melbourne Art Fair, Silvershot

In her early knitting works, Just harnessed knitting's primarily evocation of the feminine and domestic to explore notions of gender, family and self identity. Textile crafts such as knitting are intrinsically tied to humanity in common language: we speak of social fabrics, of close-knit families and of falling apart at the seams. When anxious, we knit our brows and when our bones break, they knit themselves back together again. As a sculptural medium, knitting draws people together, entices them to touch, reminds them of childhood and breaks down physical boundaries between audience and work.

Just was taught by her mother to knit at the age of twenty six, following the death of her brother. Deeply affected by knitting's potential to weave stories of love, loss and family, Just took up knitting as her primary medium. Uniform (Dad) was her first large scale knitted sculpture and pictures the artist's father in his police uniform. Fertile Ground, a life-size knitted cornfield, refers to an area where Just grew up and revisits the use of corn fields in American films as a symbol of mysticism, danger or spiritual power. LOVE was inspired by Just's interest in emotional and physical boundaries and territories. It sprung from memories of driving through frozen Connecticut, USA during Christmas, to see the lights and elaborate decorations put out in broad suburban yards. Created over a year, LOVE re-imagines a boundary hedge as a message of warmth and invitation. It also acts as a symbol of the artist's resistance to policies of exclusion, as they continue to affect people from a diversity of religious, sexual, or ethnic backgrounds. Family is a knitted sculpture of Just's own family in the form of a ghostly tree. Family arose from childhood memories Just had of climbing trees with her brother and sister and reunites them, after his death.